Sunday, April 19, 2015

London's Natural History Museum


Last week I had a post about a sparkly display that I saw at the Natural History Museum in London.  This week I thought I'd feature the museum itself.  The building was built in the Romanesque style and opened in 1881.  The exterior is composed of terra cotta tiles which were used primarily to resist the very sooty atmosphere of Victorian London.  Many of the tiles contain reliefs of flora and fauna.


The inside is quite spectacular with a central space crowned by a glass ceiling to let in the natural light.


Sitting in a place of honor on the landing of one of the grand staircases, is this statue of Charles Darwin sculpted by Sir Joseph Boehm.  (You can see him in the second photo down there on the landing.) He looks out over the main hall at the thousands of people who enter the building every day to view the the wonderful exhibits that depict the history of our world.

6 comments:

Fotolosopher said...

What a grand and gorgeous building. I could spend a couple weeks in there! Reminds me a little of the d'Orsay in Paris.

Steve said...

Enjoyed the post and photos.

Mari said...

The building itself speaks a lot of greatness, how much more inside. I'd love to visit it one day.

Catalyst said...

I love the Victorian architecture. It is truly a beautiful building.

William Kendall said...

The architectural style is magnificent.

Jack said...

It is a beautiful place that is reminiscent of many other major spaces that I have seen.